[Brougham, Henry Peter, First Baron Brougham and Vaux] : Orders in Council, or, An Examination of the Justice, Legality, and Policy of the New System of Commercial Regulations: with an Appendix of State Papers, Statutes and Authorities


 

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London, Printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, Paternoster Row, and J. Ridgeway, Picadilly, 1808, Presumed 1st Edition. Hardcover, 8vo 8" - 9" tall, [4] 114pp. Bound (somewhat crudely) in recent boards with cloth spine, half-title present, lightly toned throughout but text clear and unmarked. The British Library lists two editions of this work including one of which states 'second edition' in the title. That edition was, like this one, printed in 1808.

Henry Peter Brougham ( 1778-1868) was born in Edinburgh, the eldest son of a modest Westmorlan squire he would eventually rise to be Lord Chancellor. He was educated at Edinburgh University and was called to the Scottish Bar in 1800 where his debating skills were superior to his knowledge of the law but this did not stop him from being called to the English Bar in 1807. In 1802 he helped launch the Edinburgh Review and by 1807 his influence had turned it into a Whig party organ and his first political were amongst abolishonist supporters of William Wilberforce. However despite his rhetorical brilliance, Brougham's politics were somewhat more radical than the Whig Party leaders with whom he became disillusioned. Seeking popular support Brougham wrote a series of pamphlets attacking 'Orders in Council' as they pertained to matters of trade. These orders sought to use trade as a weapon in the ongoing Napoleonic War and were a response to Napoleon's 'Berlin Decree'. Brougham's pamphlets would argue that the orders were ineffectual and hindered British trade. This brought him to the attention of merchants in London and Liverpool who employed Brougham as a barrister to present their petitions at the Bar of the House of Commons. Brougham's impressive performance forced the Whig leadership to act to bring him into the party and a seat was found for him in the rotten borough of Camelford.

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