Vere, Francis : The Commentaries of Sr. Francis Vere, being diverse Pieces of Service, wherein he had Command, written by himself in Way of Commentary. Published by William Dillingham


 

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Minimum quantity for "Vere, Francis : The Commentaries of Sr. Francis Vere, being diverse Pieces of Service, wherein he had Command, written by himself in Way of Commentary. Published by William Dillingham" is 1.

Cambridge, Printed By John Field, Printer to the famous University, 1657, 1st Edition. Hardcover, 4to 11" - 13" tall, [12] 209 [3]pp. Full crushed morocco gilt, sides in 3 panels with flower and vase cornerpieces, spine with acorn device in compartments, gilt dentelles, corners lightly bumped, a.e.g., marbled endpapers, internally clean and bright, illustrated with 3 engraved portraits (Sir Horace Vere, Sir Francis Vere, and Sir John Ogle), 3 double page plates (Vere's tomb and the battles of Turnhout and Nieuwpoort) and 4 double page maps/plans. A very good copy. Wing V240.

Sir Francis Vere (1560-1609), army officer and diplomat, began his military career in 1581 in the Netherlands, as a gentleman volunteer in the company of horse led by the famous Welsh professional soldier Roger Williams. He would spend much of the next twenty years in the low countries, fighting alongside fellow Protestants against the Catholic Spanish. Near the end of his life Vere recorded his memoirs of several of these campaigns. To these memoirs Vere's posthumous editor, William Dillingham, added narratives of Nieuwpoort and the parley at Ostend by Sir John Ogle; and extracts from some of the publications of Henry Hexham, Vere's page at Ostend. These were published in 1657 as 'The Commentaries...' These have been criticised for their apparent bias and self congratulatory tone. However the military historian C. H. Firth noted that ‘the object of the Commentaries was not autobiographical’ and others have suggested that Vere wrote a private work (they were not published until 48 years after his death) intended to aid the military education of future English officers. Despite the caveats, Vere was an eyewitness of the events he describes, for some of which he is a unique source, and his Commentaries remain an important source not just for the life of Vere himself, but are also a major source for the history of England and the Netherlands in this period.

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