[Binckes, William] : A Prefatory Discourse to an Examination of a Late Book, Entituled An Exposition of the Thirty Nine Articles of the Church of England, by Gilbert, Bishop of Sarum. With An Examination of some Passages in the Preface to the Exposition b


 

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London, Printed for Robert Clavell at the Peacock in St. Paul's Church yard, 1702, 1st Edition. Disbound, 4to, [4] 103 [1]pp. Clean bright copy, small work track to foredge margin of 4 leaves but otherwise in very good condition.

William Binckes (c.1654 - 1712) was an English preacher and sermon writer, noted for his term as dean of Lichfield. A strong supporter of the Church of England he first achieved notoriety for a sermon preached to convocation on 30 January 1702, the anniversary of the execution of Charles I. In his sermon he drew a parallel between that execution and the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, maintaining that, having regard to the superior dignity of a king of England in actual possession of his crown, as compared with one who was merely an uncrowned king of the Jews, and moreover disclaimed temporal sovereignty, the execution at Whitehall was an act of greater enormity than was committed at Calvary. While struggling to limit the damage done by his sermon, Binckes began his career as a champion of the lower house of convocation. A member of this body during its 1701–2 session, he joined its ‘high-church’ majority in demanding that it be allowed to conduct business without permission from the house of bishops. His Expedient Proposed (1701) put this argument, and his Prefatory Discourse (1702) revealed the underlying reason for it. The Discourse attacked Bishop Gilbert Burnet's Exposition of the Thirty Nine Articles (1699) for introducing anti-episcopal, anti-Trinitarian, and pro-dissenting interpretations of Anglican doctrine, and stated that the lower house of convocation must be able to act against such heterodoxy without hindrance from bishops contaminated by it. (ODNB)

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